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Selected Fall 2013 Course Offerings From Across Campus

AAS 561—Prof. S. Koshy, W 2-4:30 p.m.

Topic: Race and Cultural Critique
Introduction to graduate level theoretical and methodological approaches in Comparative Race Studies. As a survey of theories of race and racism and the methodology of critique, this course offers an interdisciplinary approach that draws from anthropology, sociology, history, literature, cultural studies, and gender/sexuality studies. In addition, the study of racial and cultural formation is examined from a comparative perspective in the scholarship of racialized and Gender and Women's Studies.


AFRO 500 Core Probs African-Am Studies—Prof. G. McWorter, T 3-5:50 p.m.

Introduction for grad students to the central concepts, theories, methodologies, and paradigms in Black Studies. Students will also be introduced to the key critical scholars, seminal works and emerging trends in Black Studies.

AFST 555 Mult Educ/Global Perspectives—Prof. B. Ndimande, R 4-6:50 p.m.

Examines important topics in the area of multicultural education in the United States and around the world. Engages students in the critical exploration of theories and literature that interrogate traditional views of multicultural education. Analyzes issues of race, class, gender, religion, nationality, xenophobia, homophobia, and ability in the contexts of classrooms and other educational settings. Course work focuses on an emancipatory curriculum and pedagogy for transformation and social justice education.

AIS 590 American Indian Studies Grad Seminar—Prof. J. Harjo, MW4-6:20 p.m.

Popular culture is a powerful site of expression, identity development, and conflict, and thus merits considerable critical attention. Concerned with interdisciplinary frameworks that allow us to "read" popular culture as well as with its actual forms and specific artifacts, this course seeks, first, to grasp how popular culture has legitimized the colonization of American Indian peoples and, second, to reflect on the ways in which Indians engage popular culture to assert an anti-oppression politics. Throughout the course, we ground "culture" in political contexts, paying special attention to the ways it produces consent to a colonial status quo and mediates emotions such as pleasure, disgust, satisfaction, and fear.

ANTH 515 Seminar in Anthropology—Prof. A. Lo, M 9-11:50 a.m.

Topic: Discourse Analysis

This course introduces students to the methodology of discourse analysis as it is practiced in linguistic anthropology. Through hands on exercises, students will learn how to analyze interactional data, including interviews, classroom discourse, everyday conversation, media, et al. Readings will include texts by Bucholtz, Carr, Chun, Ochs, Duranti, Goffman, Jaffe, Johnstone, and Park.

Prerequisites: Anth 512, Anth 518, or permission of the instructor.

ANTH 515 Seminar in Anthropology—Prof. E. Moodie, W 3-5:50 p.m.

Topic: Socio Cultural Theory & Ethnography

This graduate seminar, the first of a two-semester sequence, seeks to provide training in the theories that shape sociocultural anthropology as an academic discipline. Our emphasis will be on ideas and debates, focusing on the historical and philosophical foundations of particular orientations within the discipline and on their significance for the social sciences in general. We will take seriously the intellectual genealogies out of which, or against which, contemporary thought has emerged. We will also carefully attend to relationships between situated modes of knowledge and power. By the end of the term, students should be able to understand and critique dominant (often North Atlantic) ideas about humans, cultures and societies; critically read ethnography in relation to theory; become adept at understanding and using specialized concepts and terminologies; and begin thinking of their own intellectual projects in the contexts of enduring questions in anthropology.

ART 550 Writing with Video—Prof. J. Squier, R 2-4:40 p.m.

ARTE 501 Issues in Art Education—Prof. Douglas & Duncum, M 4-6:40 p.m.

Topic: Art & Cultural Theory

Drawing upon the disciplines of Philosophical Aesthetics and Cultural Studies, the course explores the intersection between theories of art and theories of culture. Theories of art to be explored include the essence theories of imitation, expression, therapy, significant form, aesthetics, and communication as well as the open, the necessary and sufficient conditions theory that informs the institutional theory of art. Theories of culture to be explored are drawn from high culture, anthropology, semiotics, and critical theory. Throughout the dominant cultural forms explored are visual. Issues of gender, race, class and globalization are addressed as well as pre-modernism, modernism, and postmodernism.

CI 507 Issues in Art Education—Prof. M. Dressman, M 4-6:50 p.m.

Topic: Theories of Instruction

This course takes a critical and historical approach to the investigation of current instructional practices in education primarily in the West, with a focus on their social and cultural antecedents and implications. We will begin with a discussion of early modernist theory and practice, including readings from Emile, by Jean Jacques Rousseau, and two recent accounts of education in the Enlightenment, Discipline and Punish, by Michel Foucault, and The Ignorant Schoolmaster, by Jacques Ranciere. We will investigate instructional practices during the rise of mass education and industrialization in the nineteenth century and the response of progressivism in the late nineteenth-early twentieth century. Multiple twentieth- and twenty-first century instructional approaches, including those based in Vygotskian/activity theory, developmentalism, Skinner/behaviorism, Taylorism, Freirean critical pedagogy, multiple intelligences, distance/online learning, multiculturalism, transcultural education, and other current socio-cultural theories of instruction will also be discussed.

The central goal of the course is for students to locate present instructional practices and their own instructional theories and practices within historical and ongoing discourses. Basic questions within historical eras and movements focusing on relations between students and teacher(s), definitions of teaching and learning, the purpose(s) of instruction and learning, and course participants’ responses to these questions will form the core of class sessions.

CI 560—Trends & Issues Language Arts—Prof. S. McCarthey, W 4-6:50 p.m.

Advanced seminar in literacy for teachers, researchers, and specialists. Focuses on trends and issues in elementary and middle school language arts. Current theories, relevant research and practical applications are considered in relation to reading, writing, listening, and speaking.

CI 563 Writing Studies I—Prof. P. Prior, W 1-2:50 p.m.

This seminar offers an introduction to writing studies, an interdisciplinary field that emerged in the 1980s and explores the theory, research and practice of writing in any context (school, workplace, home, community). Across these contexts, the course will examine issues of writing processes; the collaborative nature of writing and varied types of authorship; intersections with other modes (reading, talk, visual representation) and with varied technologies (paper, screen and other materials for production and distribution); how discourses are stabilized and meshed in writing; specialized genres and genre systems; rhetorical contexts and practices; and situated forms of learning and pedagogy (whether formal or informal). This seminar aims at helping students to engage in meaningful scholarship in this field. In addition to common readings, participation in activities, and regular informal writing, each student will select, explore and write on an issue of interest in greater depth.

CI 565 Topics Research and Writing—Prof. C. Prendergast, T 1-2:50 p.m.

Topic: Economies of Literacy

This course presents the opportunity to examine closely the conversation between two domains of knowledge: economics and literacy studies. Economic theory has long influenced research in literacy. Similarly, economics is filled with metaphors that speak of literacy: brain drain, infonomics, knowledge spillovers. We will read classic texts in literacy studies with and against texts in economics that inform them, are misused by them, and/or that they could inform. In addition to course readings, students will serve as collectors of economic theory (either by sitting in on the occasional economics lecture on campus or joining MOOC) and will bring that knowledge back to the class. Students will have choice in devising their final project for the class, whether a traditional seminar paper, multimedia project, or proposal for further study. Course texts in literacy will include: Brandt, Literacy in American Lives; Graff, Literacy Myths, Legacies and Lessons; Rose, The Mind at Work; Watkins, Class Degrees; Prendergast, Buying into English and additional articles. Readings in economics include those by Karl Marx, Joseph Stiglitz, Michael Heller, Daniel Ariely, Cristina Bicchieri.

CI 569—Topics Discourse and Writing—Prof. L. Russell, TR 3-4:50 p.m.

Topic: Rhet, Gender, Disciplined Practices
The Arror and the Loom: Rhetoric, Gender, and Disciplined Practices According to Robert Connors, rhetoric is the most purely male intellectual discipline that has existed in Western culture. Shaped by male rituals, male contests, male ideals, and masculine agendas, rhetoric began (circa 500BC) and persisted (at least through 1800) as the property of men, particularly men of property. Connors is but one metronome to thusly mark the masculinity of the field: At the risk of seeming repetitive and hyperbolic, he writes, I need to reiterate that the discipline of rhetoric, as it has evolved from the classical period through the eighteenth century, was almost absolutely male. It categorically refused entry to women and women were not merely discouraged from learning it, but were actively and persistently denied access to it. This course will examine the gendered and gendering history of rhetoric as a discipline and as a set of disciplined practices. It will consider the totalizing masculinity of rhetorical training in the classical period as well as the persistence of masculine metaphors in current rhetorical theory and practice. Of course, feminist scholars writing at the turn of this century have produced a small battery of books and articles to recover women’s historical rhetorical work and highlight its stylistic importance, its teleological distinctiveness, and its political significance. Therefore, this seminar will also consider the positions and practices of women within traditions of Western rhetoric from the classical period and into the present day. Key questions for the seminar will be: How is rhetorical education and performance differently gendered in different historical periods? What effects on rhetoric (how it’s conceived, taught, practiced, and researched) does a gendering of it produce? How does the status of rhetoric as a discipline produce or rely on gender categories and norms? What is gained and lost in the feminist project of claiming participation in an androcentric tradition? How can we understand rhetoric as related to masculinity and femininity in the present scholarly moment?

CMN 450—Rhetoric, Photography & Public Life, Prof. C. Finnegan, MWF 1-1:50 p.m.

Photographs are powerful forms of communication: they visualize social issues, make visible those who are often invisible, and foster or limit bonds of identification. This course will examine the role of photography in public contexts, i.e., those complex spaces in which citizens engage matters of common concern. As the course unfolds we will engage such questions as: What makes photographs “rhetorical”? How do photographs participate in public deliberation about social and political issues? How does photographic rhetoric shape who we imagine ourselves to be as citizens? In what ways has photography historically been used to intervene in public debate? How does the contemporary public engage photography today? Throughout the course, students will be exposed to techniques for doing research on the rhetoric of photography. Specific topics we will engage include photographs of health, war, civil rights, labor, poverty, nature/environment, “illustrious Americans,” trauma/violence, and science. We will also explore the history of various photographic technologies and the changing nature of photography in the digital age (e.g., iPhone photography).

Students should be prepared to read extensively (approx. 100 pages per week), and to write regularly about what they are reading. In terms of assignments, students will compose bothtraditional response essays as well as visual essays to elaborate ideas from our reading and viewing. Graduate students in the course will be expected to develop a research project that builds throughout the semester to a final paper of the type suitable for conference submission and, with extensive revision, eventual publication.

CMN 529, Sec. 6—Narrative in Interdisciplinary Perspective, Prof. Davis, T 2-4:50 p.m.

The goal of this seminar is to engage fresh perspectives on narrative and identify aspects of narrative that are not illuminated by current thinking. We approach these issues from an interdisciplinary perspective, juxtaposing scholarship from folklore, oral history, communication, developmental psychology, cultural psychology, and anthropology. We will listen to recordings of oral stories, and we will consider a variety of genres, including histories, oral histories, life stories, and stories of personal experience. This course was developed by Susan Davis and Peggy Miller.

CMN 538, Sec. 1—Struggle for America 1865-1941, Prof. Murphy, W 2-4:50 p.m.

Struggle for America examines the rhetorical history of the United States from Reconstruction to the Second World War. Throughout this period, activists fought over the meaning of America, addressing questions such as: Who is to be included in the American Dream? How do we define and account for race? What economic institutions will best serve the nation? Should the United States assume a major role on the world stage and, if so, what should it be? These are the issues that will concern us in this class as we examine debates over civil rights, labor, women's rights, imperialism, the New Nationalism, New Freedom, and New Deal, and military intervention in Europe and elsewhere.

CWL 571 Seminar in Literary Relations—Prof. C. Niekerk, M 3-4:50 p.m.

Topic: Transnational Euro. Modernism

Sexuality, Literature, Film: An Introduction to the History of Sexuality since 1774 In English! A seminar on the history of sexuality through the analysis of exemplary literary texts and films. This seminar looks at narrative discussions of sexuality in their societal and cultural contexts; special attention will be paid to the gendered, racial and ethnic connotations in the depiction of sexual behavior. Methodologically the course will take the ideas of Michel Foucault with his constructionist view of sexuality as its point of departure, but it will also seek to question the premises of his thinking by discussing the work of critics responding to Foucault from a variety of perspectives. Texts and films for this class are from a variety of national and cultural traditions. All readings and screenings will be in English. Authors to be discussed include: Goethe, de Sade, Kleist, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, Arthur Schnitzler, Marcel Proust, Thomas Mann, Jean Giono, Jean Rhys, Christa Wolf, and Pramoedya Ananta Toer. Films to be discussed include: The Horseman on the Roof, Eyes Wide Shut, The Dreamers, The Closet, and Wide Sargasso Sea.

ENGL 500—Intro to Criticism & Research—Prof. R. Parker, R 1-2:50 p.m.

This course is a survey-introduction to the concepts and methods of recent critical theory. In short, it is a ticket to engaged fluency in the dialogues and opportunities of contemporary criticism, designed for newer English graduate students (and more experienced graduate students) who do not already have a broad background in critical theory. We will proceed through a series of cumulative, overlapping units on new criticism, structuralism, deconstruction and poststructuralism, psychoanalysis, feminism, queer studies, Marxism, new historicism, cultural studies, critical race theory, postcolonial studies, and reader response, including attention to ecocriticism and disability studies. We will also participate in the Modern Critical Theory Tuesday evening lecture series sponsored by the Unit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory and including parallel graduate seminars from other departments. Depending on scheduling and student interests, we may devote sessions to such practical concerns for graduate study in English as research methods, graduate writing, preparing for publication, and organizing and planning one's graduate studies and academic progress intellectually and administratively. Attendance, inquisitiveness, and active participation in class discussion are crucial. Students who prefer to be seen but not heard should not enroll.

English 505—Writing Studies I, Prof. P. Prior, 1-2:50 p.m.

This seminar offers an introduction to writing studies, an interdisciplinary field that emerged in the 1980s and explores the theory, research and practice of writing in any context (school, workplace, home, community). Across these contexts, the course will examine issues of writing processes; the collaborative nature of writing and varied types of authorship; intersections with other modes (reading, talk, visual representation) and with varied technologies (paper, screen and other materials for production and distribution); how discourses are stabilized and meshed in writing; specialized genres and genre systems; rhetorical contexts and practices; and situated forms of learning and pedagogy (whether formal or informal). This seminar aims at helping students to engage in meaningful scholarship in this field. In addition to common readings, participation in activities, and regular informal writing, each student will select, explore and write on an issue of interest in greater depth.

English 578—Seminar Lit & Other Disciplines, Prof. A. Gaedtke, M 1-2:50 p.m.

Topic: Affect, Cognition, The Human

This seminar will examine how affect has emerged as a key concept at the intersection of the humanities and the sciences of the mind. While the category offers a point of contact between long standing disciplinary divisions, it has also emerged as a way to rethink intractable conceptual dualisms such as mind and body, physiology and culture, the normal and the pathological, the individual and the social, and the human and the non-human. We will critically examine recent claims made in the fields of cognitive science, neuroscience, neo-phenomenology, and cultural theory while assessing their political, philosophical, historical, and aesthetic implications. In addition we will discuss several works of contemporary fiction that address this cognitive turn toward affect and its cultural implications. If the humanities have long been invested in psychoanalytic models of the mind, we will consider what it would mean for our disciplines to engage critically and productively with these emergent discourses of affect. Finally, we will ask what transdisciplinary space might be opened between the humanities and the cognitive sciences. This seminar is sponsored by the UIUC Network for Neurocultures and the Graduate College’s Intersect Program.

English 578—Seminar Lit & Other Disciplines, Prof. Carico, W 3-4:50 p.m.

Topic: Theories of Racial Capitalism

In a moment when many disciplines across the humanities and social sciences are returning to questions of political economy, this interdisciplinary seminar will attend to the knot that binds together racial formations and the formations of capitalism. Much of our course will be focused on the American scene, considered both at a wide angle from early settler colonialism to twentieth-century acts of Asian exclusion to more recent instances of minority asset-stripping and in close-up through a more sustained focus on slavery, its commodity logics, and their residues. We will close the semester by considering the political implications of two emergent and seemingly divergent fields of scholarship, the history of capitalism, and the new materialism in literary studies each of which can be understood as iterations of the contemporary turn to political economy. A number of overarching questions will guide our inquiries: Are the impulses that subtend racial capitalism isomorphic with the impulses that subtend the American project? How does the law enact and order the modes of racial subjection required by capitalism’s insuperable profit motives? How is the incessant reproduction of race implicated with capitalism’s unending moment of primitive accumulation? In what ways does racial commodification structure the category of the human, and how can that ontological crisis be redressed? And should a critique of racial capitalism necessarily entail a critique of history’s narratological underpinnings? That is, does that critique also demand that we reconsider the conditions of possibility for narrating the past’s difference in and from the present, or the conditions of possibility for critique itself? Possible readings may include works by W. E. B. Du Bois, Cedric J. Robinson, Saidiya Hartman, David Kazanjian, Ian Baucom, Bill Brown, Stephen Best, Lisa Lowe, Silvia Federici, and Angela Mitropoulos.

English 578--Seminar Lit & Other Disciplines, Prof. Littlefield, T 12-2:50 p.m.

Topic: Bodies in Science and Culture

Bodies are central to knowledge production: they are what we work with, on, in, and through. But how have bodies been defined and redefined by science and culture? In this course, we will examine this question through a range of historical and contemporary readings and case studies: from the history of anatomy illustration to Barbie’s anthropometry, from body modification to theories of “fitness.” This graduate course is intended to serve students in a wide range of disciplines, from the sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences. Although our focus will be a socio-historical approach, we will engage in an interdisciplinary dialogue about bodies that welcomes many different perspectives.

English 581--Seminar Literary Theory, Prof. Byrd, T 3:30-5:30

Topic: Indigenous--Digital Natives, Technology and Indigenous Critical Theory

With #idlenomore and the rise of social media for indigenous activism, decolonization, and mobilization, questions emerge about the role digital technology plays in indigenous modes of resistance locally and globally. This course, in conjunction with the fall symposium on Indigenous New Media, will look at some of the recent scholarship in indigenous studies that considers the impact of media, technology, and digital cultures on knowledge production at the site of materiality, recognition, and language. In reading key texts across a range of disciplines from video game studies to queer theory, the course will ask students to consider how a concept like indignity mobilizes and disrupts the structures of settler colonialism and notions of spatiality, territoriality, temporality, and futurity. Some of the texts may include Ian Bogost, Unit Operations, Judith Halberstam, The Queer Art of Failure, Mishuana Goeman, Mark My Words, Mark Rifkin, When Did Indians Become Straight, Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas, Red: A Haida Manga, and Chadwick Allen, Trans-Indigenous.

English 582—Topics Research and Writing, Prof. C. Prendergast, T 1-2:50 p.m.

Topic: Economies of Literacy

This course presents the opportunity to examine closely the conversation between two domains of knowledge: economics and literacy studies. Economic theory has long influenced research in literacy. Similarly, economics is filled with metaphors that speak of literacy: brain drain, infonomics, knowledge spillovers. We will read classic texts in literacy studies with and against texts in economics that inform them, are misused by them, and/or that they could inform. In addition to course readings, students will serve as collectors of economic theory (either by sitting in on the occasional economics lecture on campus or joining MOOC) and will bring that knowledge back to the class. Students will have choice in devising their final project for the class, whether a traditional seminar paper, multimedia project, or proposal for further study. Course texts in literacy will include: Brandt, Literacy in American Lives; Graff, Literacy Myths, Legacies and Lessons; Rose, The Mind at Work; Watkins, Class Degrees; Prendergast, Buying into English and additional articles. Readings in economics include those by Karl Marx, Joseph Stiglitz, Michael Heller, Daniel Ariely, Cristina Bicchieri.

English 584—Discourse and Writing, Prof. L. Russell, R 3-4:50 p.m.

Topic: The Arror and the Loom: Rhetoric, Gender, and Disciplined Practices

According to Robert Connors, rhetoric is “the most purely male intellectual discipline that has existed in Western culture.” Shaped by “male rituals, male contests, male ideals, and masculine agendas,” rhetoric began (circa 500BC) and persisted (at least through 1800) as “the property of men, particularly men of property.” Connors is but one metronome to thusly mark the masculinity of the field: “At the risk of seeming repetitive and hyperbolic,” he writes, “I need to reiterate that the discipline of rhetoric, as it has evolved from the classical period through the eighteenth century, was almost absolutely male. It categorically refused entry to women” and women were “not merely discouraged from learning it, but were actively and persistently denied access to it.” This course will examine the gendered and gendering history of rhetoric as a discipline and as a set of disciplined practices. It will consider the totalizing masculinity of rhetorical training in the classical period as well as the persistence of masculine metaphors in current rhetorical theory and practice. Of course, feminist scholars writing at the turn of this century have produced a small battery of books and articles to recover women’s historical rhetorical work and highlight its stylistic importance, its teleological distinctiveness, and its political significance. Therefore, this seminar will also consider the positions and practices of women within traditions of Western rhetoric from the classical period and into the present day. Key questions for the seminar will be: How is rhetorical education and performance differently gendered in different historical periods? What effects on rhetoric (how it’s conceived, taught, practiced, and researched) does a gendering of it produce? How does the status of rhetoric as a discipline produce or rely on gender categories and norms? What is gained and lost in the feminist project of claiming participation in an androcentric tradition? How can we understand rhetoric as related to masculinity and femininity in the present scholarly moment?

EPS 590—Language, Identity, and the Politics of Schooling, Prof. Dyson, M 4-7 p.m.

Language is, in one way or the other, at the root of our identities, our relationships with others, and, indeed our world view. Moreover, in school, language use—discourse—is a site of sociocultural differences and of gross inequities. Indeed, it is impossible to understand how schools become places of privilege and oppression without this understanding. How is language linked to the sociocultural history and political structure of a country, and to the identity of a speaker? What do basic questions about language, development, and variation have to do with education in a multidialectal, multilingual world? Through readings from Chomsky to Bakhtin, from textbook definitional chapters to read aloud fiction capturing language’s variety, the course aims to provide a conceptual foundation for those entering advanced study in education (no previous linguistic education required) and a place to explore key language concepts of interest. Although emphasis will be placed on the situation in the U.S., the politics of Englishes globally will be included, as will changing visions of oral/written relationships (and communicative hybrids like spoken word). All students will be allowed intellectual space to pursue their interests.

EPS 590—Contemporary Childhoods and Popular Culture, Prof. Dyson, W 4-7 p.m.

Contemporary childhoods and youths are infused with popular culture, from the ways they make their bodies texts through clothes and make-up, to the musicians and sports teams that mark their social affiliations, the films and TV shows they watch, the toys they want, and the social media they use.  Childhoods, youths, and literacies themselves are all being played out in new ways. This course focuses on the interplay between the nature of contemporary childhoods and youth and the nature of popular culture.  We will begin by defining basic concepts, chief among them, what is "popular culture"? What is "childhood" or "youth"? What role does schooling play in our media-saturated world?  I will set the theoretical stage for our work, but all class members will participate in teaching others about particular aspects of popular culture, given their own expertise.

GWS 550—Feminist Theories & Methods, Prof. M. Nguyen, T 2-4:50 p.m.

Interdisciplinary study in diverse feminist theories and methods produced in and across various disciplines. Contemporary philosophical and theoretical developments in the study of gender to specific histories of class, race, ethnicity, nation and sexuality.

GWS 590—Topics in GWS, Prof. Cole, M, 2-4:50 p.m.

Topic: Dialogues in Feminism & Tech

Part of a massively distributed collaborative learning experiment, this seminar investigates the intersection of gender and technoculture. Built around a shared set of recorded dialogues with preeminent thinkers and artists concerning feminisms and technologies, the course utilizes collaborative resources, texts, and even objects to examine policy, accessibility, innovation, and citizenship. Student projects may utilize Scalar (a non-linear publishing platform) or the on-campus Fab Lab to build gender-conscious technologies and networks, situating them within local, interdisciplinary, and international conversations. Through reading, discussion, writing and making, we will add to a growing and global database of materials relating feminist technologies to economies, identities, infrastructures, and movements.

HIST 591—History and Social Theory, Prof. T. Chaplin, T 3-4:50 p.m.

Theory—love it or hate it, social theory provides the epistemological framework through which historians, sociologists and other scholars in the humanistic and social science disciplines conceptualize our world. Our task this semester will be to come to grips with some of the central thinkers and concepts structuring classical and contemporary social theory. Our goal will be to develop a modicum of familiarity and comfort with material that is renowned for its complexity—and in so doing to begin to create a “theoretical toolbox” that is both available and useful to us as historians. We will examine the works of canonical 19th century and 20th century thinkers, as well as postmodern, feminist, postcolonial and queer critical responses to them. Our readings will draw on the scholarship of such theorists as Comte, Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Freud, Gramsci, Habermas, Geertz, Bourdieu, Lacan, Foucault, de Certeau, Lyotard, Scott, Butler, Fanon, Said, Bhaba, Halberstam and Ahmed.

KINES 594—Bodies in Science and Culture, Prof. M. Littlefield, T 12-2:50 p.m. (Meets with ENGL 578)

Bodies are central to knowledge production: they are what we work with, on, in, and through. But how have bodies been defined and redefined by science and culture? In this course, we will examine this question through a range of historical and contemporary readings and case studies: from the history of anatomy illustration to Barbie’s anthropometry, from body modification to theories of “fitness.” This graduate course is intended to serve students in a wide range of disciplines, from the sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences. Although our focus will be a socio-historical approach, we will engage in an interdisciplinary dialogue about bodies that welcomes many different perspectives.

LING 588—Seminar Second Language Learn, Prof. N. Markee, TR 9:30-10:50 a.m.

Topic: Alternative Approaches to SLA

LIS 590—Advanced Problems in LIS, Prof. C. Cole, M 2-4:50 p.m.

Topic: Dialogues in Feminism & Tech

Part of a massively distributed collaborative learning experiment, this seminar investigates the intersection of gender and technoculture. Built around a shared set of recorded dialogues with preeminent thinkers and artists concerning feminisms and technologies, the course utilizes collaborative resources, texts, and even objects to examine policy, accessibility, innovation, and citizenship. Student projects may utilize Scalar (a non-linear publishing platform) or the on-campus Fab Lab to build gender-conscious technologies and networks, situating them within local, interdisciplinary, and international conversations. Through reading, discussion, writing and making, we will add to a growing and global database of materials relating feminist technologies to economies, identities, infrastructures, and movements.

LIS 590AP--Publishing as an Information Profession, Prof M. Bonn, W 9-11:50 a.m.

This course will be organized around in-depth explorations of publishing functions ranging from acquisitions through distribution, with a special focus on how those functions have been inflected and sometimes transformed by digital technologies and networked communication. Students will emerge from the course with an understanding of publishing fundamentals, both as traditionally practiced and in the current state of digital play. The course aims to prepare students for further in-depth study or for practical work experience in the practice of publishing. The instructor's professional and research experience is in scholarly publishing and developing new roles for academic libraries as publishers, and the course will be informed by that experience and will be ever-mindful of the ways in which traditional librarian skill sets (such as collection development, metadata preparation and management and user outreach) overlap with and/or complement the skill sets of publishing professionals. At the same time, the course will address the emerging landscape of trade and specialty publishing in order to help students consider and prepare for careers in those areas of publishing.

As well as preparing papers and presentations, students will participate, as a group, in the development and production of a publication TBD and will also accompany the instructor in her process of publishing an issue of The Journal of Electronic Publishing and an edited volume on Academic Libraries and Scholarly Publishing. The class will alternate formal discussion sessions complemented by student presentations with hands-on workshops applying the publishing topics discussed the previous week. The workshops will contribute significantly to the creation of a completed publication.

MDIA 580—Advanced Interpretive Methods, Prof. N. Denzin, W 12-2:50 p.m.

Analysis of social interaction based on the social psychology of C. H. Cooley, G. H. Mead, and W. I. Thomas; presentation of problems of theory, concepts, and method.

MDIA 590—Special Topics, Prof. C. Cole, M 2-4:50 p.m.

Topic: Dialogues in Feminism & Tech

Part of a massively distributed collaborative learning experiment, this seminar investigates the intersection of gender and technoculture. Built around a shared set of recorded dialogues with preeminent thinkers and artists concerning feminisms and technologies, the course utilizes collaborative resources, texts, and even objects to examine policy, accessibility, innovation, and citizenship. Student projects may utilize Scalar (a non-linear publishing platform) or the on-campus Fab Lab to build gender-conscious technologies and networks, situating them within local, interdisciplinary, and international conversations. Through reading, discussion, writing and making, we will add to a growing and global database of materials relating feminist technologies to economies, identities, infrastructures, and movements.

MDIA 590—Special Topics, Prof. I. Molina, W 6-8:50 p.m.

Topic: Gender, Body Power

SOC 561—Development Theories, Prof. B. Dill, W 3:30–6:20 p.m.

Discussion of major trends in development thinking and policy, and development theories from the classics in political economy through modernization theory, dependency, alternative development, neoliberalism, human development and post-development. Addresses ongoing challenges and debates such as globalization and democratization, and trends in social science, such as discourse analysis. Enables participants to assess development theories in a historical context and from the viewpoint of sociology of development knowledge.

SOC 580--Advanced Interpretive Methods, Prof. Denzin, W 12-2:50 p.m. (Same as MDIA 580)

Analysis of social interaction based on the social psychology of C. H. Cooley, G. H. Mead, and W. I. Thomas; presentation of problems of theory, concepts, and method.