The Center for Writing Studies

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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Selected Spring 2009 Course Offerings From Across Campus

ANTHRO 512 LANGUAGE AND CULTURE, Keller, T 3-5:50

This course offers advanced students an introduction to theoretical foundations of anthropological linguistics. An historical review of seminal ideas and debates provides groundwork for a consideration of contemporary issues in language and culture and offers a framework for designing research. The final third of the course is devoted to student focused scholarship. Each member of the class will develop a theoretical and associated methodological focus for a research problem.

ANTHRO 515A CULTURES OF CAPITALISM, Orta, TR 9-11:50

Remember capitalism? This graduate seminar will be an extended examination of capitalism with three goals in mind. The first is to consider capitalism as a cultural formation: anchored in specific premises about the human condition, enabled through certain mediating technologies and institutions of production, circulation, and communication, practiced through specific social formations entailing distinct forms of personhood, hierarchy, etc., and unfolding across particular times and places. A second aim of this seminar will focus us more specifically on capitalism as a frame of intercultural entanglements. From Adam Smith’s 18th century treatise on The Wealth of Nations to an intensifying 21st century focus on international business, capitalism, as a conceptual and practical system, has always entailed engagement with others. Thirdly, and in dialogue with these other two goals, we will read a selection of ethnographies of capitalism--some very recent, others still worth revisiting.

AFRO 598 RES SEM IN AFRICAN-AM STUDIES, McWorter, W 9-11:50

Topic: Information Technology and the Black Experience

ARTS 499 WRITING WITH VIDEO, Squier, TH 1-3:40

writingwithvideo.net

CI 507 ADVANCED LANGUAGE ARTS PEDAGOGY Dyson, M 5-7:50

CI 562 LINGUISTICS AND THE SCHOOL CURRICULUM, McCarthey, T 1-3:50

Analyzes linguistics for the school curriculum including dialect diversities, new theories of grammar, lexicography, and variations in oral and written forms of language; gives attention to discourse analysis and ethnography of communication. Prerequisite: Admission to a doctoral program or consent of instructor. Reviews theory and research on the acquisition of writing, including consideration of cognitive processes employed during writing, the acquisition of writing competence, assessment of writing skill, and methods of instruction in basic and advanced written communication skills.

CI 580 QUAL RESEARCH IN LANGUAGE & LITERATURE EDUCATION, Dyson, TR 5-7:50

Focuses on the goals and nature of qualitative, observational study of life in educational settings, with an emphasis on oral and written languages. Adopts interpretive and critical perspectives on research and includes key readings on the ethnography of oral and written communication in schools, given a socioculturally and linguistically diverse society. All students will conduct a small scale study in an education site. Prerequisite: At least one semester of graduate course work.

CINE 504 THEORIES OF CINEMA, Flinn, T 5-7:50

Seminar on influential theories and accompanying debates about the textual/extra-textual mechanisms and cultural/political impact of cinema and related screen media. Same as CWL 504 and ENGL 504.

CMN 529

Topic: Narrative in Interdisciplinary Perspective, P. Miller, 2-4:50 TR

Topic: History of Communication Theory & Research, C. Jacobs, 2-4:50 W

CMN 538 SEMINAR IN RHETORICAL THEORY, Finnegan, W 2-4:50

Topic: The Problem of the Public

Most formulations of communication assume the existence of something called "the public." As citizens, we behave as if there is a public in which our participation matters. As teachers, we teach as if there is a public to be addressed and influenced by our students. As researchers, we study rhetoric and politics as if it exists in a public space that we are capable of locating, grasping, and describing. As activists, we work as if it is possible to change norms of public engagement. But what precisely is this thing we call "the public"? In the 1920's John Dewey wrote about "the public and its problems." This seminar tweaks Dewey's framework to suggest that the public is the problem. If we wish our work to speak to or about "the public," scholars of communication must come to terms with ongoing contestation over the term itself. This seminar will engage a range of critical and theoretical literature so that students may familiarize themselves with this foundational construct of rhetorical and political theory. Questions we will engage include: How best should we conceptualize "the public"? Is it a space? A mode of communication? An attitude? A habit? How are we to understand what happens "in public"? What is the role of media in framing our experiences of publicity? What modes of citizenship are enabled or disabled by the ways we choose to be "in public"? How do race, class, gender, and sexuality influence our sense of what constitutes "the public"? In exploring these and other questions, a number of tensions will emerge, including those between public/private, facts/norms, inclusion/exclusion, consensus/dissent, public/technical, civil society/the state, bourgeois/proletarian, rational/spectacular, visual/verbal, unity/division, wholeness/oneness, dominance/acquiescence, and private/intimate. Assignments include a series of short response papers, an annotated bibliography, and the option of either a final paper or take-home exam, depending on the individual student's goals and interests. Students do not need previous coursework in rhetoric to take this seminar.

ENGLISH 506 WRITING STUDIES II, Prendergast, W 1-2:50

This course explores literacy and race: as mutually consituting concepts, as "problems" national discourse and scholarship alike seek to address, as markers of identity. In addition to examining how relationships between race and literacy have been historically constructed, we will be problematizing those relationships in terms of critical race theory, postcolonial theory, and the literature on "whiteness." Of particular interest will be how race is constructed as a category in and through research on literacy; in the scope of our reading we will encounter the epistemological assumptions, methodological scramblings, and critica/political allegiances that have created the intertwining histories of literacy and race. Texts: Cornelius, When I Can Read My Title Clear: Literacy, Slavery, and Religion in the Antebellum South; Heath, Ways with Words; Smitherman, Talkin and Testifyin; Prendergast, Literacy and Racial Justice; V. Young, Your Average Nigga; M. Young, Minor Re/Visions: Asian American Literacy Narratives as a Rhetoric of Citizenship. Same as CI 564.

ENGL 584 TOPICS DISCOURSE & WRITING, Schaffner, M 3-5:50

Topic: Writing for the Web: The Informatics of New Media Authoring
This seminar is for students interested in studying and creating innovative digital scholarship. The theme of the course will be the informatics of writing and composing online digital texts. Students will read scholarship on new-media authorship while learning to code an array of web texts "by hand" in html, css, and using simple javascript. The seminar will meet for a two-hour discussion section followed by a one-hour coding tutorial. The projects will involve such things as an inquiry into digital literacy, an invent-your-own-typeface site, a moving-image project, the creation of a video game, a simulation and more. Students need not have any experience creating web sites; experienced students will be able to move at an accelerated pace.

EIL 587 SEMINAR IN SECOND LANGUAGE STUDIES, Sadler, TR 8:30-9:50

Topic: Virtual Worlds and Beyond: Teaching Language in Today's Networked World

In the Course we will explore how computer networks (the Internet) can be used in the language teaching/learning
process to engage in authentic communication to enhance learning, examine and experiment with Virtual Worlds (e.g. Second Life), Discussion Boards, Blogs, Wikis, Podcasting, Audio Chat, Video Conferencing & more. As we become familiar with these tools through readings (which will provide theory) and practice, we’ll use these tools to create activities/lessons that we will practice in collaboration.

GWS 560 FEMINIST MEDIA STUDIES, Treichler, W 3-5:50

Interdisciplinary graduate-level course in feminist theory, with an emphasis on the humanities.  Explores current debates in feminist theory as they pertain to humanities disciplines.

GWS 590 TOPICS IN GWS

Topic: Cultures of Discipline, C. Cole, 3:00-5:50 T

Topic: Queer Theory, S. Somerville, 1:00-2:50 TR

HIST 591 History and Social Theory, Liebersohn, T 3-4:50

Introduces recent historical work drawing upon theories and concepts from the social sciences; considers fields of inquiry which include family history, demographic history, labor history, prosopographical and entrepreneurial studies, local and regional studies, and others.

LING 555 SOCIOLING OF WORLD ENGLISHES, Bhatt, TR 10-11:20

In-depth profile of the sociolinguistics of English as an international language, including study of the processes of nativization and acculturation, the development of new culture-specific discourse types and literatures, attitudes of native and non-native speakers toward the power and domination of English, and approaches to teaching English in international contexts. Prerequisite: LING 450 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

LIS 590 INFORMATION TECH. AND THE BLACK EXPERIENCE, McWorter, W 9-11:50

LIS 590 IBL, INQUIRY-BASED LEARNING, Bruce, M 9:-11:50

Inquiry-based learning is a powerful way of thinking about learning as it occurs in libraries, museums, community centers, homes, workplaces, or online, as well as in formal settings, such as schools and universities. It implies the creation of environments in which learners are actively engaged in making meaning through personal and collaborative inquiry. It does not ignore the usual focus on content/skills: "What should be taught?," or method: "How should we teach?" but begins with even more basic questions about the nature of learning and life. Because of this, considerations of inquiry-based learning lead directly to issues of lifelong learning, the nature of knowledge, purpose, social justice, and democracy. This broad sweep makes it impossible to encapsulate inquiry-based learning in a simple framework or method. But it is also an indication of its importance in defining ways of thinking about the meaning of community, the roles of teachers and students, the relations between school and society, and how learning and life go together. In the course we will examine the nature of inquiry and of inquiry-based learning, drawing on philosophical, historical, and critical sources such as Jane Addams, John Dewey, Paolo Freire, and Myles Horton. We'll read about, observe, and engage in inquiry-based learning. In the course of this, we'll also consider challenges to inquiry-based learning, including those related to management, assessment, basic skills, cultural differences, and pedagogical goals.

LIS 590 THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF INFORMATION, Schiller, T 9-11:50

LIS 590 UNDERSTAND MULTIMEDIA INFORMATION, Downie, T 4-6:50

LLS 596 GRADUATE SEMINAR IN LLS, Ngo, T 4-6:50

Topic: Comparative Race Studies: Theories & Methods

MDIA 578 COMMUNICATION ETHICS, Christians, T 1-2:50

This course introduces the latest literature in, or directly relevant to, communication, media and information ethics. It examines current efforts in applied and professional ethics, feminist ethics, and social ethics to develop ethical models that are cross-cultural, gender inclusive and international. The major ethical issues are considered in such areas as global communication, new media technologies, information systems, news, and entertainment.

MDIA 590 SPECIAL TOPICS, Cole, T 3-5:50

Topic: Cultures of Discipline

SOC 583 QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS, Zerai, TR 2-3:20

Introduction to field and qualitative methods in social science research, in terms of both the practical issues of conducting this type of research and the conceptual debates in the field. Methods include interviewing, participant observation, unobtrusive observation, historical/archival methods, and global ethnography.