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University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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Graduate Resources

Special Field Exam: Sample Reading List

Writing In/Across the Disciplines - Karen J. Lunsford

Theory and Practice

Anderson, Benedict. (1991). Imagined communities: Reflections on the origin and spread of nationalism (Rev., expanded ed.). London: Verso Books.

Bakhtin, Mikhail Mikhailovich. (1981). Discourse in the novel (Caryl Emerson & Michael Holquist, Trans.). In Michael Holquist (Ed.), The dialogic imagination: Four essays (pp. 259-422). Austin: University of Texas Press.

Bakhtin, Mikhail Mikhailovich. (1986). The problem of speech genres (Vern W. McGee, Trans.). In Caryl Emerson & Michael Holquist (Eds.), Speech genres and other late essays (pp. 60-102). Austin: University of Texas Press.

Bauman, Marcy Lassota. (1999). The evolution of internet genres. Computers & Composition, 16, 269-282.

Bawarshi, Anis. (2000). The genre function. College English, 62, 335-360.

Bazerman, Charles. (1988). Shaping written knowledge: The genre and activity of the experimental article in science. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.

Bazerman, Charles. (1994). Systems of genres and the enactment of social intentions. In Aviva Freedman & Peter Medway (Eds.), Genre and the new rhetoric (pp. 79-101). London: Taylor & Francis.

Bazerman, Charles & Paradis, James. (Eds.). (1991). Textual dynamics of the professions: Historical and contemporary studies of writing in professional communities. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.

Beaufort, Anne. (1997). Operationalizing the concept of discourse community: A case study of one institutional site of composing. Research in the Teaching of English, 31, 486-529.

Bishop, Wendy. (1999). Places to stand: The reflective writer-teacher-writer in composition. College Composition and Communication, 51, 9-31.

Blakeslee, Ann M. (1997). Activity, context, interaction, and authority: Learning to write scientific papers in situ. Journal of Business and Technical Communication, 11, 125-169.

Bové, Paul A. (1988). The rationality of disciplines: The abstract understanding of Stephen Toulmin. In Jonathan Arac (Ed.), After Foucault: Humanistic knowledge, postmodern challenges (pp. 42-70). New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press.

Britton, James. (1992). Theories of the disciplines and a learning theory. In Anne Herrington & Charles Moran (Eds.), Writing, teaching, and learning in the disciplines (pp. 47-60). New York: Modern Language Association.

Brown, Ann L.; Ash, Doris; Rutherford, Martha; Nakagawa, Kathryn; Gordon, Ann; & Campione, Joseph C. (1993). Distributed expertise in the classroom. In Gavriel Salomon (Ed.), Distributed cognitions: Psychological and educational considerations (pp. 188-228). Learning in doing: Social, cognitive, and computational perspectives. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Bruffee, Kenneth A. (1999). Collaborative learning: Higher education, interdependence, and the authority of knowledge (2nd, expanded ed.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

Carlton, Susan Brown. (1995). Composition as a postdisciplinary formation. Rhetoric Review, 14, 78-87.

Cole, Michael & Engeström, Yrjö. (1993). A cultural-historical approach to distributed cognition. In Gavriel Salomon (Ed.), Distributed cognitions: Psychological and educational considerations (pp. 1-46). Learning in doing: Social, cognitive, and computational perspectives. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Couture, Barbara & Rymer, Jone. (1993). Situational exigence: Composing processes on the job by writer's role and task value. In Rachel Spilka (Ed.), Writing in the workplace: New research perspectives (pp. 4-20). Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.

Cross, Geoffrey A. (1994). Collaboration and conflict: A contextual exploration of group writing and positive emphasis. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.

Cross, Geoffrey A. (2000). Collective form: An exploration of large-group writing. [1998 outstanding research lecture.] Journal of Business Communication, 37, 77-100.

Cushman, Ellen. (1999). Critical literacy and institutional language. Research in the Teaching of English, 33, 245-274.

Dannels, Deanna P. (2000). Learning to be professional: Technical classroom discourse, practice, and professional identity construction. Journal of Business and Technical Communication, 14, 5-37.

Dewey, John. (1985). How we think. In Jo Ann Boydson (Ed.), How we think and selected essays, 1910-1911. The middle works of John Dewey (Vol. 6, pp. 177-356). Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press. (Original work published 1910).

Dias, Patrick; Freedman, Aviva; Medway, Peter; & Paré, Anthony. (1999). Worlds apart: Acting and writing in academic and workplace contexts. Rhetoric, society, and knowledge. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Duin, Ann Hill & Hansen, Craig. (1994). Reading and writing on computer networks as social construction and social interaction. In Cynthia L. Selfe & Susan Hilligoss (Eds.), Literacy and computers: The complications of teaching and learning with technology (pp. 89-112). New York: Modern Language Association.

Duin, Ann Hill & Hansen, Craig J. (1996). Nonacademic writing: Social theory and technology. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Dunmire, Patricia L. (2000). Genre as temporally situated social action: A study of temporality and genre activity. Written Communication, 17, 93-138.

Ede, Lisa & Lunsford, Andrea. (1984). Audience addressed/audience invoked: The role of audience in composition theory and pedagogy. College Composition and Communication, 35, 155-171.

Elbow, Peter. (1999). In defense of private writing: Consequences for theory and research. Written Communication, 16, 139-170.

Ervin, Elizabeth. (1999). Academics and the negotiation of local knowledge. College English, 61, 448-470.

Eubanks, Philip. (1998). Genre and technical translation: Social, textual, and educational exigence. Journal of Business and Technical Communication, 12, 50-70.

Flower, Linda; Long, Elenore; & Higgins, Lorraine. (2000). Learning to rival: A literate practice for intercultural inquiry. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Foucault, Michel. (1976). The archaeology of knowledge (A. M. Sheridan Smith, Trans.). New York: Harper and Row.

Freedman, Aviva & Adam, Christine. (1996). Learning to write professionally: 'Situated learning' and the transition from university to professional discourse. Journal of Business and Technical Communication, 10, 395-427.

Fulkerson, Richard. (1996). The Toulmin model of argument and the teaching of composition. In Barbara Emmel, Paula Resch, & Deborah Tenney (Eds.), Argument revisited, argument redefined: Negotiating meaning in the composition classroom (pp. 45-72). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Gee, James Paul. (2000). The new literacy studies: From 'socially situated' to the work of the social. In David Barton, Mary Hamilton & Roz Ivanic (Eds.), Situated literacies: Reading and writing in context (pp. 180-196). New York: Routledge.

Geisler, Cheryl. (1994). Academic literacy and the nature of expertise: Reading, writing, and knowing in academic philosophy. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Goankar, Dilip Parameshwar. (1997). The idea of rhetoric in the rhetoric of science. In Alan G. Gross & William M. Keith (Eds.), Rhetorical hermeneutics: Invention and interpretation in the age of science (pp. 25-85). Albany: State University of New York.

Goodwin, Charles & Duranti, Alessandro. (1992). Rethinking context: An introduction. In Alessandro Duranti & Charles Goodwin (Eds.), Rethinking context: Language as an interactive phenomenon (pp. 1-42). Studies in the social and cultural foundations of language 11. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Grant-Davie, Keith. (1997). Rhetorical situations and their constituents. Rhetoric Review, 15, 264-279.

Halasek, Kay. (1999). A pedagogy of possibility: Bakhtinian perspectives on composition studies. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.

Hanks, William F. (1996). Language and communicative practices. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.

Haswell, Richard; Briggs, Terri L.; Fay, Jennifer A.; Gillen, Norman K.; Harrill, Rob; Shupala, Andrew M.; & Trevino, Sylvia S. (1999). Context and rhetorical reading strategies: Haas and Flower (1988) revisited. Written Communication, 16, 3-27.

Hicks, Deborah. (1997). Working through discourse genres in school. Research in the Teaching of English, 31, 459-485.

Hilgers, Thomas L.; Hussey, Edna Lardizabal; & Stitt-Bergh, Monica. (1999). "As you're writing, you have these epiphanies": What college students say about writing and learning in their majors. Written Communication, 16, 317-353.

Hunter, Lynette. (1999). Critiques of knowing: Situated textualities in science, computing and the arts. New York: Routledge.

Hutchins, Edwin. (1995). Cognition in the wild. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Hymes, Dell. (1974). Foundations in sociolinguistics: An ethnographic approach. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

James, William. (1991). Pragmatism. Amherst, NY: Prometheus Books. (Original work published 1907).

Johnson, Robert R. (1997). Audience involved: Toward a participatory model of writing. Computers & Composition, 14, 361-376.

Jolliffe, David A. (Ed.). (1988). Advances in writing research, volume 2: Writing in academic disciplines. Norwood, NJ: Ablex.

Kamberelis, George. (1999). Genre development and learning: Children writing stories, science reports, and poems. Research in the Teaching of English, 33, 403-460.

Keller-Cohen, Deborah. (Ed.). (1994). Literacy: Interdisciplinary conversations. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.

Kelly, Christine & Zak, Michele. (1999). Narrativity and professional communication: Folktales and community meaning. Journal of Business and Technical Communication, 13, 297-317.

Knorr-Cetina, Karin. (1999). Epistemic cultures: How the sciences make knowledge. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Kuhn, Thomas S. (1970). The structure of scientific revolutions (2nd ed.). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

LaFollette, Marcel C. (1992). Stealing into print: Fraud, plagiarism, and misconduct in scientific publishing. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Langer, Judith A. (1992). Speaking of knowing: Conceptions of understanding in academic disciplines. In Anne Herrington & Charles Moran (Eds.), Writing, teaching, and learning in the disciplines (pp. 69-85). New York: Modern Language Association.

Latour, Bruno. (1996). ARAMIS, or the love of technology (Catherine Porter, Trans.). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Latour, Bruno. (1999). Pandora's hope: Essays on the reality of science studies. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Lave, Jean & Wenger, Etienne. (1991). Situated learning: Legitimate peripheral participation. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Lee, Carol D. & Smagorinsky, Peter. (Eds.). (2000). Vygotskian perspectives on literacy research: Constructing meaning through collaborative inquiry. Learning in doing: Social, cognitive, and computational perspectives. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

LeFevre, Karen Burke. (1987). Invention as a social act. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.

Lunsford, Andrea & Ede, Lisa. (1996). Representing audience: 'Successful' discourse and disciplinary critique. College Composition and Communication, 47, 167-179.

Lyne, John. (1998). Knowledge and performance in argument: Disciplinarity and proto-theory. Argumentation and Advocacy, 35, 3-9.

Marsella, Joy; Hilgers, Thomas L.; & McLaren, Clemence. (1992). How students handle writing assignments: A study of eighteen responses in six disciplines. In Anne Herrington & Charles Moran (Eds.), Writing, teaching, and learning in the disciplines (pp. 174-188). New York: Modern Language Association.

Martin, J. R. & Vell, Robert. (1998). Reading science: Critical and functional perspectives on discourses of science. New York: Routledge.

Matsuda, Paul Kei & Jablonski, Jeffrey. (March 26, 2000). Beyond the L2 metaphor: Towards a mutually transformative model of ESL/WAC collaboration. academic.writing 1. http://aw.colostate.edu/articles/matsuda_jablonski2000.htm.

Maybin, Janet. (2000). The new literacy studies: Context, intertextuality and discourse. In David Barton, Mary Hamilton & Roz Ivanic (Eds.), Situated literacies: Reading and writing in context (pp. 197-209). New York: Routledge.

McCarthey, Sarah J. (1998). Constructing multiple subjectivities in classroom literacy contexts. Research in the Teaching of English, 32, 126-160.

Messer-Davidow, Ellen; Shumway, David R.; & Sylvan, David J. (Eds.). (1993). Knowledges: Historical and critical studies in disciplinarity. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press.

Miller, Carolyn R. (1994). Genre as social action. In Aviva Freedman & Peter Medway (Eds.), Genre and the new rhetoric (pp. 23-42). London: Taylor & Francis. (Originally published in Quarterly Journal of Speech, 70 (1984), 151-167.).

Mirel, Barbara. (1998). 'Applied constructivism' for user documentation: Alternative to conventional task orientation. Journal of Business and Technical Communication, 12, 7-49.

Myers, Greg. (1990). Writing biology: Texts in the social construction of scientific knowledge. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.

Newell, William H. (Ed.). (1998). Interdisciplinarity: Essays from the literature. New York: College Entrance Examination Board.

Ochs, Elinor; Jacoby, Sally; & Gonzales, Patrick. (1994). Interpretive journeys: How scientists talk and travel through graphic space. Configurations, 2, 151-171.

Ochs, Elinor; Taylor, Carolyn; Rudolph, Dina; & Smith, Ruth. (1992). Storytelling as a theory-building activity. Discourse Processes, 15, 37-72.

Odell, Lee. (1992). Context-specific ways of knowing and the evaluation of writing. In Anne Herrington & Charles Moran (Eds.), Writing, teaching, and learning in the disciplines (pp. 86-98). New York: Modern Language Association.

Paré, Anthony. (1993). Discourse regulations and the production of knowledge. In Rachel Spilka (Ed.), Writing in the workplace: New research perspectives (pp. 111-123). Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.

Petraglia, Joseph. (1995). Spinning like a kite: A closer look at the pseudotransactional function of writing. Journal of Advanced Composition, 15, 19-33.

Porter, James E. (1992). Audience and rhetoric: An archaeological composition of the discourse community. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Porter, James E. (1998). Rhetorical ethics and internetworked writing. Greenwich, CT: Ablex.

Prior, Paul A. (1998). Writing/Disciplinarity: A sociohistoric account of literate activity in the academy. Rhetoric, knowledge, and society. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Rorty, Richard. (1998). Truth and progress. Philosophical papers (Vol. 3). Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Samraj, Betty & Swales, John M. (2000). Writing in conservation biology: Searching for an interdisciplinary rhetoric. Language and Learning Across the Disciplines, 3, 36-56.

Selzer, Jack. (Ed.). (1993). Understanding scientific prose. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.

Star, Susan Leigh. (Ed.). (1995a). The cultures of computing. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell.

Star, Susan Leigh. (Ed.). (1995b). Ecologies of knowledge: Work and politics in science and technology. SUNY series in science, technology, and society. Albany: State University of New York Press.

Stroupe, Craig. (2000). Visualizing English: Recognizing the hybrid literacy of visual and verbal authorship on the Web. College English, 62, 607-632.

Sullivan, Dale L. (1996). Displaying disciplinarity. Written Communication, 13, 221-250.

Sullivan, Patricia & Dautermann, Jennie. (Eds.). (1996). Electronic literacies in the workplace: technologies of writing. Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English.

Swales, John M. (1990). Genre analysis: English in academic and research settings. The Cambridge applied linguistics series. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Swales, John M. (1998). Other floors, other voices: A textography of a small university building. Rhetoric, knowledge, and society. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Tindale, Christopher W. (1999). Acts of arguing: A rhetorical model of argument. SUNY series in logic and language. Albany: State University of New York Press.

Toulmin, Stephen E. (1964). The uses of argument. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press. (Original edition published 1958).

Toulmin, Stephen E. (1972). Human understanding. Oxford, England: Clarendon.

Toulmin, Stephen E.; Rieke, Richard; & Janik, Allan. (1984). An introduction to reasoning. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company. (Original edition published 1979).

Vygotsky, Lev Semenovich. (1978). Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes. (Michael Cole, Vera Hon-Steiner, Sylvia Scribner, & Ellen Souberman, Eds.) Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Wells, Gordon. (1999). Dialogic inquiry: Towards a sociocultural practice and theory of education. Learning in doing: Social, cognitive, and computational perspectives. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Wenger, Etienne. (1999). Communities of practice: Learning, meaning and identity. Learning in doing: Social, cognitive, and computational perspectives. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Wertsch, James V. (1991). Voices of the mind: A sociocultural approach to mediated action. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

White, Jeff. (2000). Hypersuasion and the new ethos: Toward a theory of ethical linking. Kairos 5.1
http://english.ttu.edu/kairos/5.1/binder.html?features/white/bridgenw.html

Witte, Stephen P. (1992). Context, text, intertext: Toward a constructivist semiotic of writing. Written Communication, 9, 237-308.

Wittgenstein, Ludwig. (1958). Philosophical investigations (G.E.M. Anscombe, Trans.) (3rd ed.). Oxford, England: Basil Blackwell. (Original edition published 1953).

Yancey, Kathleen Blake & Spooner, Michael. (1998). A single good mind: Collaboration, cooperation, and the writing self. College Composition and Communication, 49, 45-62.

Yates, JoAnne. (1989). Control through communication: The rise of system in American management. Studies in industry and society. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

Qualitative Research Methodologies

Anderson, Paul V. (1998). Simple gifts: Ethical issues in the conduct of person-based composition research. College Composition and Communication, 49, 63-89.

Becker, Howard S. (1996). The epistemology of qualitative research. In Richard Jessor, Anne Colby, & Richard A. Shweder (Eds.), Ethnography and human development (pp. 53-71). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Blyler, Nancy Roundy. (1996). Narrative and research in professional communication. Journal of Business and Technical Communication, 10, 330-351.

Briggs, Charles L. (1986). Learning how to ask: A sociolinguistic appraisal of the role of the interview in social science research. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Brodkey, Linda. (1996). Writing permitted in designated areas only. Pedagogy and cultural practice 4. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Chiseri-Strater, Elizabeth. (1991). Academic literacies: The public and private discourse of university students. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook.

Cintron, Ralph. (1993). Wearing a pith helmet at a sly angle: Or, can writing researchers do ethnography in a postmodern era? Written Communication, 10, 371-412.

Cintron, Ralph. (1997). Angels' town: Chero ways, gang life, and the rhetorics of the everyday. Boston: Beacon.

Clifford, James. (1986). On ethnographic allegory. In James Clifford & George E. Marcus (Eds.), Writing culture: The poetics and politics of ethnography (pp. 98-121). Berkeley: University of California Press.

Doheny-Farina, Stephen. (1993). Research as rhetoric: Confronting the methodological and ethical problems of research on writing in nonacademic settings. In Rachel Spilka (Ed.), Writing in the workplace: New research perspectives (pp. 253-267). Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.

Fitch, Kristine L. (1998). Text and context: A problematic distinction for ethnography. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 31, 91-107.

Gaskins, Suzanne; Miller, Peggy J.; & Corsaro, William A. (1992). Theoretical and methodological perspectives in the interpretive study of children. In William A. Corsaro & Peggy J. Miller (Eds.), Interpretive approaches to children's socialization (pp. 5-23). New directions for child development. No. 58. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Geertz, Clifford. (1973). The interpretation of cultures. New York: Basic Books.

Heath, Shirley Brice. (1983). Ways with words: Language, life and work in communities and classrooms. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Johanyak, Michael F. (1997). Analyzing the amalgamated electronic text: Bringing cognitive, social, and contextual factors of individual language users into CMC research. Computers and Composition, 14, 91-110.

Kirsch, Gesa E. (1999). Ethical dilemmas in feminist research: The politics of location, interpretation, and publication. Albany: State University of New York Press.

Lu, Min-Zhan & Horner, Bruce. (1998). The problematic of experience: Redefining critical work in ethnography and pedagogy. College English, 60, 257-277.

Mortensen, Peter & Kirsch, Gesa E. (Eds.). (1996). Ethics and representation in qualitative studies of literacy. Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English.

Pratt, Mary Louise. (1986). Fieldwork in common places. In James Clifford & George E. Marcus (Eds.), Writing culture: The poetics and politics of ethnography (pp. 27-50). Berkeley: University of California Press.

Shweder, Richard A. (1996). True ethnography: The lore, the law, and the lure. In Richard Jessor, Anne Colby, & Richard A. Shweder (Eds.), Ethnography and human development (pp. 15-52). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Segal, Judy; Paré, Anthony; Brent, Doug; & Vipond, Douglas. (1998). The researcher as missionary: Problems with rhetoric and reform in the disciplines. College Composition and Communication, 50, 71-90.

Spigelman, Candace. (2000). Across property lines: Textual ownership in writing groups. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press for the National Council of Teachers of English.

Sternglass, Marilyn S. (1997). Time to know them: A longitudinal study of writing and learning at the college level. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Sullivan, Patricia & Porter, James E. (1997). Opening spaces: writing technologies and critical research practices. New Directions in Computers and Composition Studies. Greenwich, CT: Ablex.

Van Maanen, John. (1988). Tales of the field: On writing ethnography. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Walvoord, Barbara E. & McCarthy, Lucille Parkinson (et al.). (1990). Thinking and writing in college: A naturalistic study of students in four disciplines. Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English.

Historical Research Methodologies

Bass, Randy. (1999). Story and archive in the twenty-first century (Symposium: English 1999). College English, 61, 659-670.

Berlin, James A. (1996). Rhetorics, poetics, and cultures: Refiguring college English studies. Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English.

Brereton, John C. (1995). The origins of composition studies in the American college, 1875-1925: A documentary history. Pittsburgh series in composition, literacy, and culture. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press.

Connors, Robert J. (1997). Composition-rhetoric: Backgrounds, theory, and pedagogy. Pittsburgh series in composition, literacy, and culture. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press.

Daniell, Beth. (1999). Narratives of literacy: Connecting composition to culture. College Composition and Communication, 50, 393-410.

Dillon, W. Tracy. (1997). The new historicism and studies in the history of business and technical writing. Journal of Business and Technical Communication, 11, 60-73.

Faigley, Lester. (1992). Fragments of rationality: Postmodernity and the subject of composition. Pittsburgh series in composition, literacy, and culture. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press.

Gale, Xin Liu & Gale, Fredric G. (Eds.). (1999). (Re)Visioning composition textbooks: Conflicts of culture, ideology and pedagogy. Albany: State University of New York Press.

Goggin, Maureen Daly. (1997). Composing a discipline: The role of scholarly journals in the disciplinary emergence of rhetoric and composition since 1950. Rhetoric Review, 15, 322-348.

Graff, Gerald. (1987). Professing literature: An institutional history. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Harris, Joseph. (1997). A teaching subject: Composition since 1966. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Hawhee, Debra. (1999). Composition history and the Harbrace College Handbook. College Composition and Communication, 50, 504-523.

Hawisher, Gail E.; LeBlanc, Paul; Moran, Charles; & Selfe, Cynthia L. (1996). Computers and the teaching of writing in higher education, 1979-1994: A history. Norwood, NJ: Ablex.

Miller, Susan. (1991). Textual carnivals: The politics of composition. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.

Miller, Thomas P. (1997). The formation of college English: Rhetoric and belles lettres in the British cultural provinces. Pittsburgh series in composition, literacy, and culture. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press.

Nelms, Gerald. (1992). The case for oral evidence in composition historiography. Written Communication, 9, 356-384.

Russell, David R. (1991). Writing in the academic disciplines, 1870-1990: A curricular history. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.