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Writers Workshop: Writer Resources

Writing Tips: Writing Resources for Graduate Students

Academic Writing for Graduate Students, 3rd Edition: Essential Tasks and Skills

John M. Swales & Christine B. Feak

Publication Date: July 9, 2012 | ISBN-10: 0472034758 | ISBN-13: 978-0472034758 | Edition: 3rd Edition

Like its predecessor, the third edition of Academic Writing for Graduate Students explains understanding the intended audience, the purpose of the paper, and academic genres; includes the use of task-based methodology, analytic group discussion, and genre consciousness-raising; shows how to write summaries and critiques; features Language Focus sections that address linguistic elements as they affect the wider rhetorical objectives; and helps students position themselves as junior scholars in their academic communities.

Science Research Writing: A Guide for Non-Native Speakers of English

Hilary Glasman-Deal

Release date: December 18, 2010 | ASIN: B007MRWYTE

This book is designed to enable non-native English speakers to write science research for publication in English. It is a practical, user-friendly book intended as a fast, do-it-yourself guide for those whose English language proficiency is above intermediate. The approach is based on material developed from teaching graduate students at Imperial College London and has been extensively piloted. The book guides the reader through the process of writing science research and will also help with writing a Master's or Doctoral thesis in English. Science writing is much easier than it looks because the structure and language are conventional. The aim of this book is to help the reader discover a template or model for science research writing and then to provide the grammar and vocabulary tools needed to operate that model. There are five units: Introduction, Methodology, Results, Discussion/Conclusion and Abstract. The reader develops a model for each section of the research article through sample texts and exercises; this is followed by a Grammar and Writing Skills section designed to respond to frequently-asked questions as well as a Vocabulary list including examples of how the words and phrases are to be used.

Writing an Applied Linguistics Thesis or Dissertation: A Guide to Presenting Empirical Research

John Bitchener

Release date: January 5, 2010 | ISBN-10: 0230224547 | ISBN-13: 978-0230224544

This step-by-step guide looks at how to organize the content and structure of a thesis. Each chapter considers a different section and discusses the relevant function, content and linguistic characteristics. Providing worked analysis of an example text, it includes exercises to help students practically apply the information.

*Appropriate for a social science type thesis or dissertation—very practical and clear

Grammar Choices for Graduate and Professional Writers

Nigel Caplan

Publication Date: September 6, 2012 | ISBN-10: 0472035010 | ISBN-13: 978-0472035014

Grammar Choices is a guide to the choices available to academic writers in English. Although there are certainly some rules governing acceptable and unacceptable grammar, there are far more choices to be made among grammatically acceptable forms that have different meanings. The ability to control these meanings will help students communicate more effectively and efficiently in graduate-level and professional academic writing. Grammar Choices is a different kind of grammar book: It is written for graduate students, including MBA, master's, and doctoral candidates, as well as postdoctoral researchers and faculty. Additionally, it describes the language of advanced academic writing with more than 300 real examples from successful graduate students and from published texts, including corpora. Activities encourage students to investigate the language choices that are typical of their own academic disciplines or professional fields through structured reading and writing activities. Grammar Choices is cross-referenced with Academic Writing for Graduate Students, 3rd edition (Swales & Feak, 2012).

Each of the eight units in Grammar Choices contains: an overview of the grammar topic; a preview test that allows students to assess their control of the target grammar and teachers to diagnose areas of difficulty; an authentic example of graduate-student writing showing the unit grammar in use; clear descriptions of essential grammar structures using the framework of functional grammar, cutting-edge research in applied linguistics, and corpus studies; vocabulary relevant to the grammar point is introduced—for example, common verbs in the passive voice, summary nouns used with this/these, and irregular plural nouns; authentic examples for every grammar point from corpora and published texts; exercises for every grammar point that help writers develop grammatical awareness and use, including completing sentences, writing, revising, paraphrasing, and editing; and a section inviting writers to investigate discipline-specific language use and apply it to an academic genre.

Thesis and Dissertation Writing in a Second Language: A Handbook for Supervisors

Brian Paltridge and Sue Starfield

Publication Date: July 18, 2007 | ISBN-10: 0415371732 | ISBN-13: 978-0415371735

The relationship of supervisor to student has traditionally been seen as one of apprenticeship, in which much learning is tacit, with the expectation that the student will become much like the tutor. The changing demographics of higher education in conjunction with imperatives of greater accountability and support for research students have rendered this scenario both less likely and less desirable and unfortunately many supervisors are challenged by the task of guiding non-native speaker students to completion. This handbook is the ideal guide for all supervisors working with undergraduate and postgraduate non-native speaker students writing a thesis or dissertation in English as it explicitly unpacks thesis writing, using language that is accessible to research supervisors from any discipline.

Navigating Academia: Writing Supporting Genres

John M. Swales & Christine B. Feak

Publication Date: February 25, 2011 | ISBN-10: 047234537 | ISBN-13: 978-0472034536

Navigating Academia is a bit different from the other volumes in the series because it focuses on the supporting genres that facilitate the more public genres that form the building blocks of an academic and/or research career. Included are statements of purpose for graduate school applications, letters of recommendation, and responses to journal reviewers.

One feature that these genres have in common is that they are largely hidden from public view; it is difficult to find examples of them in university libraries. Although guidance about these genres can increasingly be found on the Internet, this guidance is often too general to be helpful in an individual particular situation. This is unfortunate because in almost all cases, the individual needs to be seen as both a serious scholar, researcher, or instructor (whether beginning or getting established) and as a collegial but objective person. As a result, many of these academic communications need to be carefully considered, particularly with regard to the likely effect this communication will have on its intended recipients, who, more often than not, are established figures in the field (as with a job application letter). Because of the roles of these genres, this volume also differs somewhat from the others in that it is as much concerned with social academic practice as it is with more formal academic texts.

This volume represents a revision and expansion of the material on academic correspondence that appeared in English in Today's Research World.

Learning the Literacy Practices of Graduate School: Insiders' Reflections on Academic Enculturation

Christine Pearson Casanave and Xiaoming Li

Publication Date: February 4, 2008 | ISBN-10: 0472032313 | ISBN-13: 978-0472032310

Attending graduate school presents a wide variety of challenges to both American and international students at U.S. universities. Learning the Literacy Practices of Graduate School explores many of those challenges in depth, addressing the textual features and conventions that characterize and underlie the advanced literacy practices at graduate school and examining the unwritten rules and expectations of participation and interpersonal relationships between advisors and advisees and among peers. It also delves into the impact of enculturation and interaction on student and faculty identity. Many disciplines are covered, including those related to second and foreign language learners. This volume brings to light the textual, social, and political dimensions of graduate study that tend not to be spoken or written about elsewhere.

Learning the Literacy Practices of Graduate School is an inspirational resource book for graduate students and those serving as mentors for graduate students. It is indispensable for faculty members and advisors who are teaching classes that introduce students to graduate study.

*Excellent resources for the support and development of writing faculty working with English Language Learners in graduate school

Academic Writing in a Second or Foreign Language: Issues and Challenges Facing ESL/EFL Academic Writers in Higher Education Contexts

Ramona Tang

Publication Date: March 15, 2012 | ISBN-10: 1441112162 | ISBN-13: 978-1441112163

It can be a challenge writing in a language that is not your native tongue. Constructing academic essays, dissertations and research articles in this second or foreign language is even more challenging, yet across the globe thousands of academics and students do so, some out of choice, some out of necessity. This book looks at a major issue within the field of English for Academic Purposes (EAP). It focuses on the issues confronting non-native-English-speaking academics, scholars and students, who face increasing pressure to write and publish in English, now widely acknowledged as the academic lingua franca. Questions of identity, access, pedagogy and empowerment naturally arise. This book looks at both student and professional academic writers, using qualitative text analysis, quantitative questionnaire data, corpus investigations and ethnographic approaches to searchingly examine issues central to the EAP field.

*Excellent resources for the support and development of writing faculty working with English Language Learners in graduate school

Academic Writing in a Global Context: The Politics and Practices of Publishing in English, Theresa Lillis and Mary Jane Curry

Publication Date: June 20, 2010 | ISBN-10: 0415468833 | ISBN-13: 978-0415468831

Academic Writing in a Global Context addresses the issue of the pressure on academics worldwide to produce their work in English in scholarly publishing, and why the growth of the use of academic English matters. Drawing on an eight year 'text-ethnographic' study of the experiences of fifty scholars working in Europe, this book discusses these questions at both a macro and micro level – through discussions of knowledge evaluation systems on all levels, and analysis of the progress of a text towards publication. In addition to this, case studies of individual scholars in their local institutions and countries are used to illustrate experiences of using English in the academic world. Academic Writing in a Global Context examines the impact of the growing dominance of English on academic writing for publication globally. The authors explore the ways in which the global status attributed to English is impacting on the lives and practices of multilingual scholars working in contexts where English is not the official language of communication and throws into relief the politics surrounding academic publishing. This book will be of interest to postgraduates and professionals in the fields of World Englishes, language and globalization and English Language Teaching.

*Enable faculty to understand the complex global forces that impact academic publishing from historically non-Anglophone academic cultures. Many of the insights from Lillis and Curry's book can be help faculty in understanding ways of working with multilingual graduate students in the U.S.

compiled by Yu-Kyung Kang
November 2013